Trail Ratings

Difficulty Level
READ THIS FIRST

It’s important for the reader to know how I rate the trails.  I’m a veteran hiker in my sixties.  If you are a veteran hiker in your thirties, you might think the hike is a level or two easier.  If this is your first time, regardless of age, it might be a little more difficult than I suggest.

The important thing is to be honest about your condition.  Don’t kid yourself.  Hiking is a chance to get out and think about things, not see who gets there first.  Check with the doc to see if you’re ok to hike.  Start easy and work up. 

For this website, I’ll be discussing day hikes mostly.  For some hikes, you’ll need to start at daybreak and finish at dusk.  I’ll throw in some overnighters once in a while.

Each trail I describe will have a difficulty level, recommended type of hiking shoe, distance, the approximate time the hike should take, safety and any other miscellaneous tips I might have.


Difficulty Level
A Stroll In The Park

These are trails or greenways that are paved or surfaced to make walking comfortable.  Usually flat.  Most of the time they are located close to parking and other conveniences.  Bring the whole family and enjoy nature.

Click here for trails rated A Stroll In The Park


Difficulty Level
Beginner

Forest service roads and dirt trails.  Well defined and maintained.  There will be some gain and loss in elevation.  Usually close to parking and other conveniences.  You’ll get some exercise but in a more controlled environment.

Click here for trails rated Beginner


Difficulty Level
Moderate

Mostly single track trails.  There will be moderate to difficult elevation gains.  Remember we live along and in the Blue Ridge Mountains.  They don’t call them mountains without a reason.  The distances will be a little longer and you’ll be carrying snacks and water.

Click here for trails rated Moderate


Difficulty LevelModerately Advanced

This level is basically the same as the Moderate level but there is more of it.  The trails are longer and steeper.  Plan on your nose touching the ground as you climb.  If you don’t think you can make this type of hike, you probably can’t.  Practice a little more.  Find a hiking buddy.

Click here for trails rated Moderately Advanced


Difficulty Level
Advanced

You probably should not do these alone.  You should be an experienced hiker who knows about safety on the trail, first aid, equipment and what to do in an emergency.  You should be physically capable of the hike.  I like to bring a buddy who is in better shape than me and is able to carry me out if necessary. 

Click here for trails rated Advanced